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Listen to Conversation about telling the Personal information PDF  | Print |  E-mail
Listening - Listen For Beginner
Monday, 02 May 2011 03:34

Listen to Conversation about telling the Personal information

Today we are re going to meet another student from the University of Adelaide. Listen for some of the words she uses. This Video will help you practice some questions: Such as: What's your name? How old are you? What 's your Address? What is your  telephone?


about making friends and meeting different people.

JASMINE: Hi, my name's Jasmine.

And could you spell that for me?

J-A-S-M-I-N-E.

Do you study here at university?

Yes, I do.

What do you study?

I'm studying medicine.

Medicine. And how long have you been studying medicine?

This is my first year here so it's just been nine weeks, into week nine.

Where are you from?

I'm from Penang, Malaysia.

And you've only just arrived in Adelaide?

Yeah, that's right.

And do you enjoy it here?

Yes, it's good, a new environment, a new culture.

So many new things to experience, it's a good way. A new environment where you can intermingle with different

people, it's good.

How long will you be here for, do you think?

Six years, for the whole period of my course.

So you live in university housing with other students?

Yes, it's a college.

What's the address there?

Lincoln College, Brougham Place.

Can you describe a little bit about your room or the college?

We have quite a number of buildings so it's good because if you stay in this building you create a rapport,jasmine

camaraderie between the people that stay in the same floor, the same building and then we have like inter-building

competitions, like we have friendly debates or basketball competitions and all that stuff, so it's good.

That's the thing I like about Adelaide, you know, surrounded by all your parklands. That's one of the interesting

things that I have liked about Adelaide.

And the people are really nice here, interesting. New culture, new language. Although I have studied English before,

but the type of English that you use is totally different, you know, the clichéd Australian version of G'day, you

know, sort of thing, laid back. So you live and learn. You start saying things like 'heaps good,' instead of 'very good'

so you try and blend into the culture, and that's really good.

story notes

new environment

new place

new culture

different way of life

experience

Here experience is used as a verb.

It’s when something happens to you or you feel something.

I experience pain.

Experience can also be used as a noun.

It means knowledge or skill as a result of doing something.

Going to university was a good experience.

intermingle

mix together

To mingle means to mix, and the prefix inter- means together, among, or between.

The prefix inter- is today's spotlight.

quite a number of buildings

many buildings

rapport

ability to communicate well with another person

I have a good rapport with the people I work with.

*** audio - pronunciation

camaraderie

feeling of friendship

There is good camaraderie at work.

inter-building competitions

competitions between the people living in different buildings

The prefix inter- is today's spotlight.

clichéd

If something is clichéd, it is a typical way of saying something.

Australians love to say 'g'day' instead of hello.

g'day

G'day is short for good day.

Australians use it when they are saying hello.

It's a very informal but common greeting.

heaps good

Heaps good is another slang Australian expression.

Jasmine has noticed that people say things like heaps good, instead of very good.

blend into

To blend into means to mix into.

If you blend into another culture, you become part of it, so people don't notice you are from somewhere else.

spotlight

inter-

The prefix inter- means together, among, or between. It can be added to both nouns and verbs.

Rivalries between cities are called intercity rivalries.

The English football league is an intercity competition.

To connect things together is to interconnect.

The railway and the bus routes interconnect at this station.

To interchange is to make two things change places.

The student interchange between Australia and Japan is very successful.

To intermingle is to mix together:

A new environment where you can intermingle with different people, it’s good.

Inter-building competitions are competitions between the people living in different buildings:

We have quite a number of buildings so it’s good because if you stay in this building you create a rapport,

camaraderie between the people that stay in the same floor, the same building and then we have like inter-building

competitions, like we have friendly debates or basketball competitions and all that stuff, so it’s good.

more information: inter- prefix

Watch out for the word inter, which is pronounced differently and means

to bury in a grave.

Where are you going to inter the body?

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