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Unit 1: Using Useful English Idioms with "All" PDF Print E-mail

Unit 1: Using Useful English Idioms with "All"

1. Introduction:

Unit 1: Using Useful English Idioms with "All" - In this lesson, http://Englishgoonline.com will help you learn how to use English Idioms that include “all” word  in daily communication. They are  English Idioms . Such as: Put all your eggs in one basket, All in your head, All in day's work, All hell broke loose, All over the map, All eyes on me.

2. Let's Watch Video: Unit 1:

3. Let's Learn Using English Idioms in Unit 1

- Put all your eggs in one basket
- All in your head
- All in day's work
- All hell broke loose
- All over the map
- All eyes on me.

__ ___

 

Idiom

Meaning

Example Sentence

- Put all your eggs in one basket

- To risk your money or your reputation in support of one idea or plan

- I didn't want to put all my eggs in one basket, so I played five different lottery games, but lost all of them.

- All in your head

- If something is all in your head, you have imagined it and it is not real.

-  When something is thought of as reality but is only just imaginary.

- She likes you, but it is all in your head

- All in day's work

- If something is all in a day's work, it is nothing special.

- If something difficult or strange is all in a day's work for someone, it is a usual part of their job (often + for )

- Drinking champagne with Hollywood stars is all in a day's work for top celebrity reporter Gloria Evans. We worked in blizzard conditions to restore all the power lines, but it's all in a day's work.

- All hell broke loose

- When all hell breaks loose, there is chaos, confusion and trouble.

- All sorts of wild or terrible things happened.

- When the boss left early for the weekend, all hell broke loose.

- All over the map

- If something like a discussion is all over the map, it doesn't stick to the main topic and goes off on tangents.

- In or to many different places

- There was blood all over the place. I ran all over the place looking for them.

- All eyes on me.

 

- If all eyes are on someone, then everyone is paying attention to them.

-  With a lot of interest in something or someone you see

- The kids were all eyes, taking in every detail of the new house.

5. Link download Unit 1:

6. Download this Video Useful  English Idiom Lessons For Beginner- Unit 1.

7. File . doc for this lesson and Guide to learn this lesson - Unit 1

Table of Contents
Next page Google Plus

 

=======================http://EnglishGoOnline.com=====================

Last Updated on Sunday, 22 April 2012 18:10
 
Unit 1: Using Useful English Idioms with "All" PDF Print E-mail

Unit 1: Using Useful English Idioms with "All"

1. Introduction:

Unit 1: Using Useful English Idioms with "All" - In this lesson, http://Englishgoonline.com will help you learn how to use English Idioms that include “all” word  in daily communication. They are  English Idioms . Such as: Put all your eggs in one basket, All in your head, All in day's work, All hell broke loose, All over the map, All eyes on me.

2. Let's Watch Video: Unit 1:

3. Let's Learn Using English Idioms in Unit 1

- Put all your eggs in one basket
- All in your head
- All in day's work
- All hell broke loose
- All over the map
- All eyes on me.

__ ___

 

Idiom

Meaning

Example Sentence

- Put all your eggs in one basket

- To risk your money or your reputation in support of one idea or plan

- I didn't want to put all my eggs in one basket, so I played five different lottery games, but lost all of them.

- All in your head

- If something is all in your head, you have imagined it and it is not real.

-  When something is thought of as reality but is only just imaginary.

- She likes you, but it is all in your head

- All in day's work

- If something is all in a day's work, it is nothing special.

- If something difficult or strange is all in a day's work for someone, it is a usual part of their job (often + for )

- Drinking champagne with Hollywood stars is all in a day's work for top celebrity reporter Gloria Evans. We worked in blizzard conditions to restore all the power lines, but it's all in a day's work.

- All hell broke loose

- When all hell breaks loose, there is chaos, confusion and trouble.

- All sorts of wild or terrible things happened.

- When the boss left early for the weekend, all hell broke loose.

- All over the map

- If something like a discussion is all over the map, it doesn't stick to the main topic and goes off on tangents.

- In or to many different places

- There was blood all over the place. I ran all over the place looking for them.

- All eyes on me.

 

- If all eyes are on someone, then everyone is paying attention to them.

-  With a lot of interest in something or someone you see

- The kids were all eyes, taking in every detail of the new house.

5. Link download Unit 1:

6. Download this Video Useful  English Idiom Lessons For Beginner- Unit 1.

7. File . doc for this lesson and Guide to learn this lesson - Unit 1

Table of Contents
Next page Google Plus

 

=======================http://EnglishGoOnline.com=====================

Last Updated on Sunday, 22 April 2012 18:10
 


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